October192012
balancefully:

Using the Hunger & Fullness scale helps you to eat intuitively, and to become more in tune with your body’s needs.

balancefully:

Using the Hunger & Fullness scale helps you to eat intuitively, and to become more in tune with your body’s needs.

(via fitnessmash)

August22012

soneshab:

Urban Organic in the Bay Area 

Fascinating!

(Source: sacredwombman)

2PM
July272012
July252012
Hey ffers! Fish and shellfish are great for eating, but please check out this website and download your own Seafood Watch Pocket Guide to make sure you get the best fish for you and your environment!

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx

Hey ffers! Fish and shellfish are great for eating, but please check out this website and download your own Seafood Watch Pocket Guide to make sure you get the best fish for you and your environment!

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/cr_seafoodwatch/download.aspx

July242012
May62012
March52012

5 Reasons Why Being Thin Doesn’t Mean You’re Healthy

Maybe it’s because we can undoubtedly be a vain society that aligns all sorts of positive associations with beauty. The thinnest people are known as beacons of health. For most of us, our health goals lean more toward vanity than feeling good from the inside and out.

In a country where advertisements shun any extra skin and beauty is somehow linked to wealth and fame, we all want to be thin. But a number of sources have shown that being thin doesn’t necessarily translate to health.

1. It’s Not Just the Fat, But the Kind of Fat

A new study has shown that it’s not just being fat, but the kind of fat that’s the issue.

Time.com reported on the study.

[F]at deposited just under the skin doesn’t contribute that much to the development of metabolic disorders such as diabetes or heart problems. But fat accumulated in deeper tissues and organs, within muscle and embedded in organs like the liver, for example, can put you at greater risk of these diseases. And that goes for lean people too: they might not have much visible fat under the skin, but may be sequestering so-called visceral fat inside their body.”

So it’s true, there can be skinny fat people and it’s all in the kind of fat when it comes to matters of health.

2. You May Miss Routine Health Tests

If you’re thin, you’re more likely to skip on important health tests that can stave off future illness. While weight does impact chronic health issues like diabetes, cholesterol, and high blood pressure, it’s not the whole picture. Heredity along with diet and exercise, even with a high metabolism, can lead to these diseases later in life and if you’re not vigilant you could end up having a heart attack when you didn’t even know your blood pressure was through the roof.

3. Skipping Out on Exercise

Exercise is important for both lowering cholesterol and staving off diabetes. If you’re super thin, you may think that you don’t need to exercise but this is just false according to Oz Garcia, Ph.D., nutritionist, who wrote about one surprised patient:

A few years ago, one of my thinner clients who looked externally healthful came to me for a consultation after she had been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Rightfully, she was nervous and confused and couldn’t understand how she had developed this disease, she thought only “fat” people were diagnosed with these types of conditions. When asked if she exercised, she shook her head, stating that she had never really had to think about exercising or eating healthy, that she had always been lucky to have such a great metabolism.
4. Osteoporosis

If you’re not doing any weight bearing exercise because you’re thin and you’re not eating a healthy whole foods diet for the same reason, you could end up with brittle bones and even osteoporosis. You want to have some muscular tone in addition to being thin in order to avoid bone density issues later on.

5. Calorie Control Vs. Your Diet

Constantly worrying about being thin leads us to count calories rather than looking at the foods we’re eating. It’s much more important to take an aerial view of your diet based on the foods that you’re eating rather than the calories you’re consuming. Portion control is of course important but if you focus on loading your plate with fruits, vegetables and then adding on a fist worth of whole grains and protein, you’re sure to find your healthy BMI range instead of obsessing about being thin.

Source

March42012

The Scary Rise in Adult Eating Disorders

womenshealthmag:

The Scary Rise in Adult Eating Disorders

Editor’s note: We’re happy that Tumblr has discouraged the use of tags like “thinspo” and “pro-ana.”

By Jenny Deam

Eating disorders leaped into the national conscience in the 1970s and ’80s, when the number of diagnosed cases exploded. The patients were adolescent girls, many of whom became anorexic or bulimic as a means of controlling their bodies—and, by extension, their lives—as they made their way through puberty. So many girls fell victim that eating disorders were branded a teenage disease. (And experts continue to see a troubling number of cases among teen girls, says Ovidio Bermudez, M.D., board member of the National Eating Disorders Association.)

Yet lately doctors have noticed a disturbing spike among a different group: women in their late twenties, thirties, and forties. At the Renfrew Center’s 11 treatment locations, the number of patients over age 35 has skyrocketed 42 percent in the past decade.

Likewise, a couple of years ago at the Eating Recovery Center in Denver, an estimated 10 percent of patients were over age 25; today, a whopping 46 percent are over 30. And when it opened in 2003, the University of North Carolina’s Eating Disorders Program was designed for adolescents—now half of its patients are over 30 years old.

Just like their younger counterparts, adult eating disorders deliver a mind-body punch that kills more people than any other mental illness. Patients of all ages can suffer impaired brain function, infertility, dental decay, or even kidney failure or cardiac arrest.

But while the teen and adult diseases share physical symptoms, and both can be tied to deep psychological roots, their catalysts are quite different, says psychotherapist Jessica LeRoy, of the Center for the Psychology of Women in Los Angeles.

“As women get older and their lives evolve, so do their stressors and triggers,” she says. These can nudge the door open for an eating disorder. But research on the adult-onset versions is lacking—and without sufficient tools and awareness, women are being misdiagnosed.

For decades, the eating disorder lexicon had two main entries: anorexia and bulimia. But modern research reveals that these fall woefully short of encompassing the many facets of disordered eating. In the early ’90s, the American Psychiatric Association introduced a new diagnostic category: eating disorders not otherwise specified (EDNOS).

A catch-all label that includes dozens of subdiagnoses, EDNOS applies to patients who don’t meet the exact criteria for anorexia or bulimia but still have very troubled relationships with food or distorted body images. Today, EDNOS diagnoses significantly outnumber anorexia and bulimia cases.

Learn more about adult eating disorders.
Submitted by mynuejeens
March32012
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